Rare Endocrinology News

Disease Profile

Q fever

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.

Unknown

Age of onset

All ages

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ICD-10

A78

Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

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Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

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X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

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X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

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Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

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Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

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Not applicable

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Other names (AKA)

Q fever pneumonia; Coxiella Burnetii fever; Query fever

Categories

Bacterial infections

Summary

Q fever is a worldwide disease with acute and chronic stages caused by the bacteria known as Coxiella burnetii. Cattle, sheep, and goats are the primary reservoirs although a variety of species may be infected. Organisms are excreted in birth fluids, milk, urine, and feces of infected animals and are able to survive for long periods in the environment. Infection of humans usually occurs by inhalation of these organisms from air that contains airborne barnyard dust contaminated by dried placental material, birth fluids, and waste products of infected animals. Other modes of transmission to humans, including tick bites, ingestion of unpasteurized milk or dairy products, and human to human transmission, are rare. Humans are often very susceptible to the disease, and very few organisms may be required to cause infection. In less than 5% of cases the affected people with acute Q fever infection develop a chronic Q fever. Treatment of the acute form is made with antibiotics. The chronic form's treatment depends on the symptoms.[1]

Symptoms

This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. This information comes from a database called the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) . The HPO collects information on symptoms that have been described in medical resources. The HPO is updated regularly. Use the HPO ID to access more in-depth information about a symptom.

Medical Terms Other Names
Learn More:
HPO ID
80%-99% of people have these symptoms
Granuloma
0032252
30%-79% of people have these symptoms
Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate
High ESR
0003565
Elevated hepatic transaminase
High liver enzymes
0002910
Fatigue
Tired
Tiredness

[ more ]

0012378
Fever
0001945
Headache
Headaches
0002315
Muscle weakness
Muscular weakness
0001324
Myalgia
Muscle ache
Muscle pain

[ more ]

0003326
Splenomegaly
Increased spleen size
0001744
5%-29% of people have these symptoms
Abnormal heart valve morphology
0001654
Anemia
Low number of red blood cells or hemoglobin
0001903
Anorexia
0002039
Anticardiolipin IgG antibody positivity
0020136
Antimitochondrial antibody positivity
0030167
Cough
Coughing
0012735
Endocarditis
0100584
Hematuria
Blood in urine
0000790
Hepatitis
Liver inflammation
0012115
Hepatomegaly
Enlarged liver
0002240
Hepatosplenomegaly
Enlarged liver and spleen
0001433
Immunodeficiency
Decreased immune function
0002721
Increased circulating antibody level
0010702
Maculopapular exanthema
0040186
Night sweats
0030166
Pneumonia
0002090
Purpura
Red or purple spots on the skin
0000979
Rheumatoid factor positive
0002923
Smooth muscle antibody positivity
0003262
Thrombocytopenia
Low platelet count
0001873
Vasculitis
Inflammation of blood vessel
0002633
Weight loss
0001824
1%-4% of people have these symptoms
Abnormal left ventricular function
0005162
Abnormal pulmonary Interstitial morphology
Abnormality in area between air sacs in lung
0006530
Amyloidosis
0011034
Cholecystitis
Gallbladder inflammation
0001082
Cryoglobulinemia
0100778
Encephalitis
Brain inflammation
0002383
Lupus anticoagulant
0025343
Lymphadenopathy
Swollen lymph nodes
0002716
Meningitis
0001287
Myocarditis
Inflammation of heart muscle
0012819
Osteomyelitis
Bone infection
0002754
Pericardial effusion
Fluid around heart
0001698
Pericarditis
Swelling or irritation of membrane around heart
0001701
Pleural effusion
Fluid around lungs
0002202
Respiratory distress
Breathing difficulties
Difficulty breathing

[ more ]

0002098

Learn more

These resources provide more information about this condition or associated symptoms. The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may want to review these resources with a medical professional.

Where to Start

  • You can obtain information on this topic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is recognized as the lead federal agency for developing and applying disease prevention and control, environmental health, and health promotion and education activities designed to improve the health of the people of the United States.
  • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.
  • The Merck Manuals Online Medical Library provides information on this condition for patients and caregivers.
  • The National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) has a report for patients and families about this condition. NORD is a patient advocacy organization for individuals with rare diseases and the organizations that serve them.

In-Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.

References

  1. Q fever Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Center for Diseases Control and Prevention. November 13, 2013; https://www.cdc.gov/qfever/symptoms/index.html. Accessed 7/8/2015.