Rare Endocrinology News

Disease Profile

Lyme disease

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.

Unknown

Age of onset

#N/A

ICD-10

#N/A

Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

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Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

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X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

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X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

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Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

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Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

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Not applicable

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Other names (AKA)

Borreliosis; Lyme borreliosis

Categories

Bacterial infections; Nervous System Diseases

Summary

Lyme disease is the most common tickborne infectious disease in the United States. Early signs and symptoms of the condition include fever, chills, muscle pain, headache, and joint pain. As the condition progresses, affected people may experience heart problems, Bell's palsy, arthritis, abnormal muscle movement, speech problems and cognitive (thinking) abnormalities. Please visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Web site for a more comprehensive list of symptoms. Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Certain features of the condition, including whether or not an affected person will develop medication-resistant chronic arthritis, is thought to be influenced by genetic factors (certain human leukocyte antigen genes). Treatment generally includes antibiotics to address the bacterial infection and other medications (i.e. pain medications) to relieve symptoms.[1][2][3]

Symptoms

This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. This information comes from a database called the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) . The HPO collects information on symptoms that have been described in medical resources. The HPO is updated regularly. Use the HPO ID to access more in-depth information about a symptom.

Medical Terms Other Names
Learn More:
HPO ID
30%-79% of people have these symptoms
Arthritis
Joint inflammation
0001369
Cranial nerve paralysis
0006824
Joint swelling
0001386
Meningitis
0001287
5%-29% of people have these symptoms
Amaurosis fugax
0100576
Arrhythmia
Abnormal heart rate
Heart rhythm disorders
Irregular heart beat
Irregular heartbeat

[ more ]

0011675
Arthralgia
Joint pain
0002829
Atrioventricular block
Interruption of electrical communication between upper and lower chambers of heart
0001678
Dermal atrophy
Skin degeneration
0004334
Encephalitis
Brain inflammation
0002383
Fatigue
Tired
Tiredness

[ more ]

0012378
Fever
0001945
Headache
Headaches
0002315
Insomnia
Difficulty staying or falling asleep
0100785
Memory impairment
Forgetfulness
Memory loss
Memory problems
Poor memory

[ more ]

0002354
Muscle weakness
Muscular weakness
0001324
Myalgia
Muscle ache
Muscle pain

[ more ]

0003326
Nausea and vomiting
0002017
Paresthesia
Pins and needles feeling
Tingling

[ more ]

0003401
Photophobia
Extreme sensitivity of the eyes to light
Light hypersensitivity

[ more ]

0000613
Skin nodule
0200036
Uveitis
0000554

Organizations

Support and advocacy groups can help you connect with other patients and families, and they can provide valuable services. Many develop patient-centered information and are the driving force behind research for better treatments and possible cures. They can direct you to research, resources, and services. Many organizations also have experts who serve as medical advisors or provide lists of doctors/clinics. Visit the group’s website or contact them to learn about the services they offer. Inclusion on this list is not an endorsement by GARD.

Organizations Supporting this Disease

    Learn more

    These resources provide more information about this condition or associated symptoms. The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may want to review these resources with a medical professional.

    Where to Start

    • You can obtain information on this topic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is recognized as the lead federal agency for developing and applying disease prevention and control, environmental health, and health promotion and education activities designed to improve the health of the people of the United States.
    • MedlinePlus was designed by the National Library of Medicine to help you research your health questions, and it provides more information about this topic.

      In-Depth Information

      • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
      • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
      • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Lyme disease. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.

        References

        1. Lyme Disease. Center for Disease Control and Prevention. August 2015; https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/index.html.
        2. Lyme disease. MedlinePlus. February 2014; https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001319.htm.
        3. John O Meyerhoff, MD; Chief Editor: Herbert S Diamond, MD. Lyme Disease. Medscape Reference. January 2015; https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/330178-overview.